Infrared Fluorescence Lamp

Our Infrared Fluorescence lamp, Alice,  is a low-cost alternative to expensive VIS-only scientific lighting systems. This lamp provides pure visible light for infrared fluorescence photography.

Some molecules and minerals (among them some pigments) exhibit Infrared Fluorescence. This phenomenon is similar to Ultraviolet Fluorescence where a beam of ultraviolet light produces visible light emission. In the case of Infrared Fluorescence, a beam of Visible light generates an emission of Infrared radiation. This photographic method allows us to identify and locate cadmium pigments (cadmium red, cadmium yellow, cadmium green) and Egyptian blue. Infrared fluorescence photography is used in archaeology to detect even tiny fragments of Egyptian blue pigment.
Participate in our Training on Technical Photography to learn more.

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Download our catalog and check out its current cost.

Download “Our Catalog and Prices - PDF” Catalog-2020.pdf – Downloaded 3380 times – 83 KB


Features

VIS-ONLY emission. This lamp emits radiation only in the visible range with a peak at 450 nm to excite Infrared Fluorescence emission of cadmium pigments, Egyptian blue, and han blue.

Emission curve of the IRF lamp.

Works on 110 -220 -240 V. This lamp is part of the Technical Photography KIT which is designed for traveler art experts. So, the lamp can work on both 110 V (as in the USA) and 220 – 240 (as in Europe).

Power emission.  1200 lumens

Tripod adapter. A standard photographic tripod adapter, size 1/4″.


Power plug policy

All of our tools work on both 110 V (USA) and 220 V (European) voltages. You can use them worldwide.  We provide our tools with the original European power plug and a free power adapter to USA  or UK standards depending on your choice.  

 Our intro to Infrared Fluorescence Photography


Infrared Fluorescence Photography (IRF)

Infrared Fluorescence photography is a useful method for the examination of works of art and archaeology. It is part of the Technical Photography documentation and allows to detect Egyptian blue and cadmium-based pigments.

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Infrared Fluorescence photography (IRF) is an important part of a Technical Photography documentation of art and archaeology.

Infrared Fluorescence phenomenon 

infrared-fluorescence-photography-1
Some molecules and minerals (among them mineral pigments) exhibit Infrared Fluorescence. This phenomenon is similar to Ultraviolet Fluorescence where a beam of ultraviolet light produces visible light emission. In the case of infrared fluorescence, a beam of visible light generates an emission of infrared radiation.
Infrared Fluorescence is observed in few rare minerals but also in a very common molecule, chlorophyll. Chlorophyll emits infrared fluorescence in the very near infrared. Indeed, its fluorescence is brighter in the IRF 850 image – where the 850 nm filter was used, allowing through the closest infrared. Notice that, on the other hand,the infrared fluorescence emission of the cadmium red swatch is almost unchanged since it happens at longer wavelength (over  850 nm ).

Applications in Art examination

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Among historical pigments Egyptian blue, cadmium red and cadmium yellow are the ones exhibiting infrared fluorescence. As the name says Egyptian blue is the blue actually used by the Egyptians and Romans. So, infrared fluorescence photography it’s used in archaeology to detect even tiny fragments of Egyptian blue pigment.

Experimental Set up

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We need a source of Visible only-light and the camera set up for IR photography.

Applications

Infrared Fluorescence Photography for mapping different inks.

We can distinguish and map different inks, see this experiment!

References

Publications on Infrared Fluorescence photography (IRF)
A. Cosentino "Infrared Technical Photography for Art Examination” e-Preservation Science, 13, 1-6, 2016.
A. Cosentino “Iden­ti­fi­ca­tion of pig­ments by mul­ti­spec­tral imag­ing a flow­chart method” Her­itage Sci­ence, 2:8, 2014.
A. Cosentino, S. Stout "Pho­to­shop and Mul­ti­spec­tral Imag­ing for Art Doc­u­men­ta­tion” e-Preservation Sci­ence, 11, 91–98, 2014.
A. Cosentino "Effects of Different Binders on Technical Photography and Infrared Reflectography of 54 Historical Pigments” International Journal of Conservation Science, 6 (3), 287-298, 2015.

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